9th Lit: Argumentative Essay Supplemental Resources

Extra resources for research, as  well as a sample student essay, can be found below. Good luck!

Benefits of College

Should Everyone Attend College

Sample Student Essay

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Advanced Comp: Editorial Introduction Starters

Below are some simple ways to begin editorials in attention grabbing ways. By the end of the class, you should be able to select one to begin your own writing.

1. Make a controversial claim: Beginning with an outright position that is polarizing leaves zero question about the direction of your paper.

“VIRGINIA, your little friends are wrong. They have been affected by the skepticism of a skeptical age. They do not believe except they see. They think that nothing can be which is not comprehensible by their little minds. All minds, Virginia, whether they be men’s or children’s, are little. In this great universe of ours man is a mere insect, an ant, in his intellect, as compared with the boundless world about him, as measured by the intelligence capable of grasping the whole of truth and knowledge.”

2. State the facts: Just like a news report, starting with just the integral facts leaves little for the audience to wonder about.

“President Ford declared flatly today that he would veto any bill calling for “a federal bail-out of New York City” and instead proposed legislation that would make it easier for the city to go into bankruptcy.

In a speech before the National Press Club, Ford coupled repeated attacks on the city’s fiscal management with a promise that, if default came, the federal government would see to it that “essential public services for the people of New York City” would be maintained.”

3. Use a memorable line: Grab your audience’s attention by starting with a unique, startling sentence.

“It’s about ime for Leonard Edwards to take the hot squat.

Edwards, for those of you who haven’t been following his worthless career, has been convicted of two murders. He’s awaiting trial on another murder and the rape of a 14 year old girl.

He’s 29 years old. Hopes of rehabilitating this piece of human crud are doubtful. It’s even wildly optimistic to use the word doubtfully.”

4. Employ repetition: Repeating of a phrase or using parallel structure immediately advances the tone of your position.

“We were wrong, wrong, wrong.”

Categories Level 1

1 point

Level 2

2 points

Level 3

4 points

Level 4

5 points

Knowledge & Understanding

– opinion is built on research and factual evidence

– writer has at least 2 in-text citations and at least 2 Works Cited Entries

– demonstrates limited understanding of form of news article

– demonstrates limited understanding of resources read

– demonstrates adequate understanding of form of news article

– demonstrates adequate understanding of resources read

– demonstrates considerable understanding of form of news article

– demonstrates considerable understanding of materials read

– demonstrates thorough understanding of form of news article

– demonstrates thorough understanding of materials read

Thinking & Inquiry

– critical and creative thinking skills (developing ideas, selecting, organizing, explaining information)

– uses either inductive or deductive reasoning structure

 

– demonstrates limited competence developing ideas, selecting, organizing, and explaining information – demonstrates moderate competence developing ideas, selecting, organizing, and explaining information – demonstrates considerable competence developing ideas, selecting, organizing, and explaining information – demonstrates a high degree of competence developing ideas, selecting, organizing, and explaining information
Communication

– clarity

– audience and purpose

– uses at least 3 vocabulary terms from week 3.

 

– communicates information and ideas with limited clarity

– limited awareness of audience and purpose

 

– communicates information and ideas with moderate clarity

– moderate awareness of audience and purpose

 

– communicates information and ideas with considerable clarity

– considerable awareness of audience and purpose

 

– communicates information and ideas with a high degree of clarity

– thorough awareness of audience and purpose

 

Application

– language conventions (subject/verb agreement, active/passive voice)

– writing process

– uses language conventions with limited accuracy and effectiveness

– uses the writing process with limited competence

– uses language conventions with moderate accuracy and effectiveness

– uses the writing process with moderate competence

– uses language conventions with considerable accuracy and effectiveness

– uses the writing process with considerable competence

– uses language conventions with a high degree of accuracy and effectiveness

– uses the writing process with a high degree of competence

Media Monday #4 – Persuasion

Throughout the semester, students from Mr. Rossi’s 9th Grade Literature class will be
charged with examining various pieces of informational media in order to stay updated with world news, formulate opinions based on real events, and begin examining for bias.

Today’s Prompt: Write a CEEI Statement that explains what this ad campaign is trying to persuade its audience to do. Use at least two details from the video to demonstrate how this advertisement acheives its purpose.

Advanced Comp: Comparing the Relevance of Social Issues

Using the charts from the New York Times Article below, please answer some basic guiding questions to inform your brainstorming practices.

Issues in Review

THINK BIG!

  1. Look at the chart at the top of the page from January 2017. What issue listed is most important to you? Why?
  2. What issue or issues should be added or amended to the February 2017 chart to make it more applicable to the country’s needs at the present moment (exactly one year in the future)?
  3. Use the arrows to set the chart to January 1939. What surprises you about the issues presented in this chart?
  4. Find the month and year in which you were born. Which issues are still significant at this point in your life.

THINK SMALL!

  1. After reviewing the charts, please describe what issues are most important to you. How do your values and ethics control this situation?

9th Lit: Hobnail Writing Task

Hobnail Holistic Rubric

Prompts: Choose one of the following prompts to construct your writing task:

  1. Using sensory details, rewrite the climax of the story from the perspective of another character. Be sure to use imagery to illustrate the story’s primary theme.
  2. Using sensory details, write an alternate ending for the narrative. Be sure to use imagery to illustrate the story’s primary theme.  
  • A theme is obvious to the reader. points
  • My narrative’s plot includes a climax or a denouement.
  • My story is at least three paragraphs in length. _
  • I use imagery and figurative language to construct my narrative.
  • I have proofread my story and it has less than 5 grammatical errors.

Writing Assignments will be completed over a 45 minute period during class on Thursday, February 8th, 2018.

The Most Dangerous Game

Advanced Comp: Interviewing 101

Using the transcript provided and the taped interview from NPR’s Fresh Air, please answer the following questions about the interview’s structure and execution.

  1. What is the purpose of this interview’s opening section?
  2. List any “cursory” questions that are asked during the course of the interview.
  3. How would you describe Gross’ professional demeanor and speaking style?
  4. How are the order of these questions structured?
  5. Which questions are controversial?
  6. Which questions are confusingly worded?
  7. Which questions were best?

https://www.npr.org/player/embed/536822055/536872948

Follow up questions:

  1. How would you rate the quality of this interview?
  2. How would you describe Terry Gross’ style?
  3. Name one topic from the interview that you would like to learn more about.

9th Lit: Argumentative Theme Response

Throughout the semester, students from Mr. Rossi’s 9th Grade Literature class will be
charged with examining various pieces of informational media in order to stay updated with world news, formulate opinions based on real events, and begin examining for bias.

Phoebe Williams, an eighth-grader at George B. Armstrong elementary school in Chicago, Illinois, sold 5,155 boxes of Girl Scout Cookies last year. Her sales earned her a "Cookie CEO" title. Photo by Antonio Perez/Chicago Tribune/TNS

Today’s Prompt: Write a CEEI Statement that explains the central theme of the article. Use at least two details from the article to support your response.

Today’s Article